Recognizing the work of our sport managers

Boy's Hockey Managers (from left) Senior Cienna Raden, Juniors Kendall Travis and Danika Brown
Emma Smith
Boy’s Hockey Managers (from left) Senior Cienna Raden, Juniors Kendall Travis and Danika Brown

Being  a part of a team doesn’t always mean playing the game or practicing. At the Owatonna High School, sports need managers for optimal success. The managers for high school sports have many different and unique jobs.  Currently, as winter sports teams hit their stride, managers for boy’s and girl’s basketball, wrestling, boy’s and girl’s hockey, gymnastics and boy’s swimming are working hard. Some OHS sports tend to have the opposite sex as managers, although that is not always the case. Nevertheless, managers are very important to athletics at the OHS and serve a great purpose to their team’s success.

Owatonna sports teams offer manager opportunities to all students. Many students enjoy taking part in sports. Cienna Raden, the boy’s hockey senior co-manager, said, “Hockey has always been in my family, so I enjoy watching the sport, and it’s fun being involved with it.”

Across the board, from fall until spring, many seek out the opportunity to be a part of one of these teams.  Boys basketball senior co-manager, Maddie Zulk said, “Being a manager is fun because we get to support the boys and still be around the game of basketball after playing for so many years.”  Managing keeps kids active throughout the year.

Being a manager offers an opportunity for students to be a part of a team without lacing up skates or putting on the headgear for a game night or event. It gives students good experience with helping other individuals, working with peers and establishing a good work ethic. Girls basketball manager and current freshmen, McKenzie Michael, said, “I enjoy watching the game, taking stats and learning the basics of the sport. I understand how the game of basketball works.”

My favorite part about being a manager is seeing the look on people’s faces, knowing that they are grateful for what we do”

— Evie Phillips

Many of the managers can create relationships with athletes and coaching staff.  Sophomore wrestling co-manager Jade Huseby, said, “I like being able to be a part of a team and getting to know the wrestlers and other managers throughout the season. The meets are really fun and intense, and I enjoy watching the wrestlers improve over the year and what they can accomplish.”  Becoming a manager offers a number of opportunities for connecting with other students and coaches.

The work done by sports managers is especially recognized and appreciated.  Boy’s Swim and dive co-manager freshman Evie Phillips said, “My favorite part about being a manager is seeing the look on people’s faces, knowing that they are grateful for what we do.”  
Both coaches and players value the hard work the managers do. Girls hockey head coach Joel Tornell said, ”It makes it easier for coaches and players with less to worry about; it lets them focus on the game.” Managers save the coaches a tremendous amount of time allowing  them to focus on preparing their athletes for a game or a practice ahead. OHS Gymnastics Head Coach Tom Smith, said, “The biggest benefit to the team is the work that the managers do. They are a huge morale booster to some of the gymnasts as well.”  With managing comes great responsibility, but altogether, it offers a great experience to be a part of a team and help others excel in athletics.