The student news site of Owatonna High School.

Magnet

The student news site of Owatonna High School.

Magnet

The student news site of Owatonna High School.

Magnet

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Ikhlas Haji is a junior at OHS this year. This is her first year in Magnet. Haji joined Magnet to get an idea of what might interest her in the future. She also joined to improve her writing and communication...

Magnet Staffer 2023-24
Jose Rosas
Editor-in-Chief

Jose Rosas is a senior at the OHS this year. This is his third year in Magnet. He joined because he enjoyed journalism his freshman year and thought Magnet would be a fun learning experience. Outside of...

Ella Highfield is a senior at OHS, and it is her second year on Magnet staff. Outside of school she dances for Just For Kix dance studio. She is also involved in YoungLife, DECA, Link Crew, SHOC and Thriving...

Editorial: You define your character

The+problematic+relationship+between+self-imposed+and+imposed+standards+leads+to+the+focus+on+students+character+as+a+solution.+
Design by Jace Forcelle
The problematic relationship between self-imposed and imposed standards leads to the focus on students’ character as a solution.

At OHS, students every day seem pressured to develop and conform to self-imposed and imposed standards. However, the relationship between the standards extends to a larger issue.

Students’ relationships with self-imposed standards are influenced by the standards forced on them in clubs, sports, and classes.

When students participate in curricular and extracurricular activities–academics, sports and clubs; students are forced to meet the expectations inflicted by the activities. Furthermore, students proceed to center themselves around the expectation of generalized standards to develop their characters instead of referring to themselves. 

Students’ relationship relationship with expected-standards extends to self-imposed standards. Students conform to the standards society enforces. Moreover, students look to exceed the expectations of the imposed standards to perfect their character.

Students should refer to themselves to develop their character by analyzing their actions, beliefs and passions while maintaining a relationship with the imposed standards of their worth.

In other words, we–as students–can imitate and conform to expectations from ourselves and others, but these reflections are not who we are and don’t define us. We all have our own unique personalities.


This editorial was originally published in the January Print Edition.

About the Contributor
Magnet Staff, OHS Tradition
We are an eclectic group of: Photographers, Critical Thinkers, Writers, Graphic Designers, Dreamers, Sometimes Snarky, Netflix Binge-ers, Coffee Addicts, Sports Fans, Prideful Owatonnas. Mostly, we are a family.  If interested in joining, stop by the Newsroom in B 103. Thanks for reading.