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Jade Hanson

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Casey Cumberland
Somali Culture Night Graphic

Mixed Roots, is a group that’s purpose is to be a social group for diversity. Mixed Roots is hosting a Somali Culture Night on Thursday, February 22 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Small Group Forum. Prepared for the night is a presentation on Somali cultural traditions, a fashion show to showcase the Somali dress, food, music and dance. The Somali Culture Night is open to all students who are wanting to learn more about the Somali Culture.

The presentation has been put together to answer some of the most common questions that people will ask about the Somalian Culture. The presentation will go through the most important aspects of the tradition such as weddings, their food and on the cultural everyday dress. Mrs. Suzanne Jokela was explaining the effort the students have put in to make this night a reality, she said, “They are very dedicated, and they want to do a really good job.” The event has been put together by students who have shown an interest, and the students have taken leadership by deciding what the activities for the night are.

When sophomore Asii Gazali gave an insight of what the presentation was on, she said, “It is giving examples of the traditional food, traditional clothes, why they wear the hijab and questions that we get asked the most. If we had to muster up everything up into one presentation on the culture, that’s what it will be on.”

 

They are very dedicated, and they want to do a really good job.”

— Mrs. Suzanne Jokela

Some events that students are excited for are, is the fashion show, the dance and the henna. There will be a fashion show that will touch on the dress of the culture to give examples of their everyday dress, wedding attire and more.

When sophomore Fahima Jama explained which activity is most looking forward to, she said, “The dancing part. I’m most excited for the food too because people don’t usually get the chance to try Somali food.” Henna will be provided for free, as well as a supper consisting of a traditional meal and rice after the presentations.

The Somali Culture Night has been put together to keep the Somali culture alive by teaching it to the students who are interested in learning more. Freshman Roda Aden was asked why she thought this night was important for her culture, and she said, “It makes us feel like we fit in more when people understand the reasons why we do the things we do more.” It makes us feel like we fit in more when people understand the reasons why we do the things we do more.

It makes us feel like we fit in more when people understand the reasons why we do the things we do more.”

— Roda Aden

If you can’t make it this night, but are still interested in learning more about different cultures, you can become a part of the mixed roots group. They meet Wednesdays at 2:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in C-200 until the end of the school year. Everyone is welcome.

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About the Contributors
Jade Hanson, Editor In Chief

Jade Hanson is a junior at Owatonna High School. This is her second year being a part of the OHS Magnet family, and she is ecstatic to be taking on the...

Casey Cumberland, Design Editor

Casey Cumberland am a senior at OHS, he manage a lot of things for the magnet website as well as graphic design. He joined magnet for his second year in...

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